Category: PC Reviews

Dragon Age II Mark of the Assassin

With new DLC comes new adventures in the Free Marches and another chance to spend time with party members that did a wonderful job of carrying the story in Dragon Age II. However in the case of Dragon Age II: Mark of the Assassin we not only get to once more spend time with the ones that we already know but video gamers also get to meet a whole new character named Tallis. Note: I wouldn’t click that link until after playing through Mark of the Assassin or watched Dragon Age: Redemption. 

Tallis is an elf on a mission voiced by Felicia Day, but don’t let Miss Day’s normally pleasant demeanor fool you; there is something going on with Tallis that is far more in depth than you are led to believe. In fact the whole of what is Tallis isn’t what you are lead to believe. I’m not going to get into her backstory suffice it to say that she is quite different than any elf you’ve aligned yourself with so far in the Dragon Age world.

Dragon Age II: Mark of the Assassin Gameplay

While 90% of the game is similar to Dragon Age II there are a few tidbits here and there that need mentioning. Firstly the “stealth” aspect of the game. While this could potentially be a good idea it seems rather out of place. In it you have three options for sneaking 1.) Stay out of site 2.) Distract them with a rock 3.) Hit them in the head to knock them out. There is a very small modicum of skill or understanding required, but for me it was mostly “Just knock everyone out and move”My hulking clunking tank is not known for his stealthiness or tact. Were I to use my rogue then yes, this would seem a tad more normal however as it stands it feels like they just wanted to try something new. This is not a bad thing and it could play well in future Dragon Age games, however it just feels tacked on.

Dragon Age II: Mark of the Assassin Characters

Dragon Age 2 Mark of the Assassin Review

Bad Wyvern! That cake wasn't for you!

Second thing worth mentioning is the fact that they did a very nice job taking Felicia Day and translating her into an elf. Facial mapping was spot on and her voice acting (as expected) was sublime. I had not watched Redemption when I began my foray into the Free Marches so I found myself asking “Why am I supposed to care about Tallis?” Even as it ends there is little backstory to her so, while I’m sure she’s nice, I just didn’t care about her. That did not, however, stop me from flirting my tank ass off. This just lends credence to the “Hawke is a Whore” theme that seems to permeate Dragon Age II. The gender or sexual preference of the person I’m talking to doesn’t matter, I’m going to make myself “available”. Loudly if need be.

Dragon Age II: Mark of the Assassin Combat

Third there is the combat. This is the standard Dragon Age II style combat where the more mages the better you are. After one particularly nasty “optional boss” I had to restart my game loaded with mages in my party to ensure victory. While not my idea of the “perfect party” it seemed to make the rest of the game fairly easy. However other than this one optional boss the DLC seems fairly cut and dry.

Dragon Age II: Mark of the Assassin Cameos

Fourth we have this:

Dragon Age II was not without it’s cameo’s and neither is Mark of the Assassin. Teagan makes a comeback and he does so with Isolde who utters a line that proves to be very difficult to remove from ones ears once it decides to pay a visit. Granted Teagan and Isolde serve absolutely ZERO PURPOSE other than to utter the line in the video. It’s for this reason We’re  pretty sure that BioWare threw it in there because of this clip.

This is not the only cameo to appear in Dragon Age II: Mark of the Assassin, however the others are relatively bit players from Dragon Age II. Aside from one.

A certain bard from Origins make’s a return in what is a very confusing and potentially interesting conversation. Leliana and Tallis have a back and forth that appears to indicate there is a rather rich and deep story there involving some form of deception. Leliana appears to know precisely who Tallis is and what she wants to the point that her very presence seems to unnerve our elven companion.

Dragon Age II: Mark of the Assassin Story

Finally there is the story. As I mentioned earlier I found myself asking time and time again, “Seriously, who the expletive is this girl and why do I give a flying expletive?” The story winds up being interesting but I couldn’t help but wonder if I was supposed to watch the Redemption videos before I played the DLC. I felt that maybe I was missing out on something. But as interesting as the story was it does not appear to tie into anything in the Dragon Age world other than a way to prance Felicia Day around in Rogue Armor (not that anyone is complaining about that). I’m sure at some point in the story all points will converge into on glorious moment of “Expletive me, that was AWESOME!” As of right now, however, I’m going to be here scratching my head about it all.

All in all it’s a good bit of DLC that takes a decent tick of time to get through. However it feels like it’s a tacked on vehicle for Tallis more than anything related to the lore and wondrous world of Dragon Age. For this reason it holds it back from being truly great and leaves it in the realm of “average”.

VN:F [1.9.11_1134]
Rating: 4.0/5 (1 vote cast)

dragon age 2 legacyDragon Age 2 was a fine game that we at Polish the Console really enjoyed. While it wasn’t the marvel that Dragon Age: Origins was we can’t help but feel that perhaps we may have let our expectations from BioWare get the best of us. All in all Dragon Age 2 was a good romp through the Free Marches.

Many reviewers touted the lack of diversity in the landscape as a flaw of the game (and it was) and almost irrelevance of Hawke to the story as another drawback, BioWare looked to correct some of this in Legacy. Correct it they did. What we have is an adventure through an old Grey Warden prison buried underground that holds an ancient Darkspawn. While it’s not going to be enough to elevate Dragon Age 2 to the epic heights of Dragon Age: Origins it does serve to help lend more weight to the game by further fleshing out the tale of Hawke

Since this is just an expansion we still see the same graphics, gameplay, and control. BioWare didn’t revamp the entire system. It’s just an add on and as such we will forgo droning on about them with the same cliched analogies that you’ve heard before. What will ultimately make you want to play Legacy is the question “Is the story in Legacy worth spending $10.00 on?”

Dragon Age 2: Legacy Story

In a word, yes. I believe the word I actually used to describe it to Kat was “ballstastic”. To me this was a very worthwhile purchase. Dragon Age 2: Legacy playthrough lasted me around 2.5 – 3 hours which is fairly respectable for any expansion pack. Now this was padded intermittent pausing to take my two dogs out, so for you I would imagine that it would be less. Unless you really like to stop and enjoy the scenery.

dragon age 2 legacy gameplay

These shields are a nuisance on more than one occasion

It was interesting to me to watch the tale unfold of the family Hawke. Throughout Dragon Age 2 we were constantly reminded and spent time with the matriarchal side of the lineage, the Amells. But throughout this adventure very little was ever spoken of the Hawke side. Legacy provides a brief glimpse into the other half of Hawke’s lineage, but to be honest I found myself asking “Why do I care?” They never brought it up during the main campaign of the game, at all. I mean yes they made references to Hawke’s father so we know he existed and had some relationship with his children however not once did they ever mention that the family may have some additional purpose or strange history. It felt very tacked on.

Now this is not to say that it was not thoroughly enjoyable and interesting. As we explored our way through this Grey Warden prison my companions continued their interesting and witty banter back and fourth that elicited more than a few chuckles. Something about Isabela saying “See, this is why I don’t wear pants,” will go a long way to produce a wry smile across a man’s face.

But they didn’t stop with just an interesting story. The weapon received is not just some obligatory “here’s a fancy new sharp killy thing.” It plays an integral role in the story. In fact without it the story itself could not proceed. It’s called “The Key” and helps Hawke to complete the task at hand. While this may not sound all that interesting what sets it apart is that as the game goes on you assign traits to it based on what you want from it. Think of it a little like the weapons in Fable III, but better implemented. It’s this aspect I would like to see them develop more in future Dragon Age 2 expansions and Dragon Age 3. It became such that I got excited when I got to upgrade my weapon because I couldn’t wait to see what was out there for me. By the end I had developed the perfect weapon for my character and would have loved to have spent a little more time with it.

Now as you can tell from trailers and various pre-release information you are once more dealing with some talking Darkspawn that were believed to be seen for the first time in Dragon Age: Origins – Awakening. This was referenced in the game by Anders (who was in my party) and questioned if there was a relation between the two. What began to unfold was a much more interesting story that also gives players some insight as to the origins of the Darkspawn altogether. This was like an unexpected present of knowledge and lore and who doesn’t love that?

While the story in Legacy isn’t going to make Dragon Age 2 a game of the year it did certainly make me feel better about Dragon Age 2 as a whole. It’s something that helps create a more complete offering. While it’s not earth shattering ground breaking by any means it’s still better than you see in some games.

Ass StampAss StampAss StampAss Stamp

For this reason we’re giving Dragon Age 2: Legacy gets a 4 out 5.

 

VN:F [1.9.11_1134]
Rating: 4.0/5 (6 votes cast)

Portal has come a long way since showing the cake, in fact, was not a lie.  Ever since the success of the first, Valve has meticulously planned a sequel to the franchise.  The initial fears of the sequel were apparent.  Sequels in the video game world have not been doing quite well to hold to the original (Call of Duty, Dragon Age, BioShock; all with their corresponding reasons).  However, this was different….this was Valve.  If anyone could make an awe-inspiring sequel, it would be Valve.

POSSIBLE SPOILER ALERT.  I say possible because there are a lot of jokes and actual story elements in this iteration.  If you do plan on playing the game, some of the jokes might be spoiled.

 

 

Gameplay (5 out of 5)

Right out of the gate, the game assumes you are a new person to the Portal series (or video games themselves).  This means you will have to go through the initial tutorial levels once again, with loading screens after each simple test.  Fear not though, once the game ramps up the difficulty, and you travel deeper into the Aperture Science Laboratories, the loading screens become less apparent.  After playing through the entire Single Player campaign (and parts of the co-op so far), veterans to the series will come across some new found difficulty.  The new additions of a Hard-light bridge, Excursion Funnel, and 3 different types of gels give you a whole new sense of trying to think outside the box.  I found myself pouring over every corner of rooms before having that “oh…..duh” moment.

The addition of the co-op campaign adds the most unpredictable variable you will come across in this game…a 2nd player.  The co-op campaign is completely separate from the single player campaign (so do not feel like you are cheating yourself out of any experience by going with one or the other).  With 4 portals now (instead of 2), puzzles become even more mind-boggling than before.  Thankfully, Valve introduced gestures to help players (who might not be able to speak to each other).

There are non-mission gestures and mission.  Non-mission gestures include waving, playing rock paper scissors, teasing each other, and even hugging…awwwww.  Quite frankly, after figuring out some of these tests, you mind yourself hugging the other out of sheer excitement that the test is finally over.  Then there are mission gestures.  These act as more notifications for the other player to follow, like if you want the other player to look somewhere, or put their portal in a specific spot.  It also include a 3sec timer for times you need to complete an action at the same time.

Make sure you are a close friend with someone before playing co-op.  You might find yourself yelling at the other because they deployed the wrong portal FOR THE 1 BILLIONTH TIME KILLING YOU BOTH.  sorry…it does get frustrating if communication is not made a priority.  You will find yourself dying over even the simplest puzzles if both of you are not on the same page when navigating through these.

 

Story (4 out of 5)

Believe it or not, there is an actual story to be told in Portal 2.  You start the game where you left off from the first,  still captured, and doing exercises to keep your body and mind in shape.  However, something goes wrong, and you are not waken up for many years, until a new AI called Wheatley comes to free you from your slumber.  From there, you must once again, battle the over powering AI GlaDOS (who does not feel the emotion revenge for you killing her at all….you monster) and escape from Aperture Science.  Without giving away too much, you learn much more about all the characters, including the foundations that Aperture Science was built on, and even get to see some of their early experiments (which are quite hilarious to explore).  The narration by all the characters makes for very interesting conversation between tests, that I even looked forward to.  I was always looking forward to what was going to happen next or who would say what.  The reason I do not give this a perfect 5, is because in the end, the story elements do feel short.  With basically only 3 main characters,  there is not too much to explore.  Valve instead crams as much personality into them as possible…and it works quite well.

 

Controls & Graphics (5 out of 5)

Valve goes again with the Source engine to power the game.  This leads to the familiar feeling of swinging the view around to get your bearings correct.  For any people new to the series, the game will still give you hints as to what a certain button press will do (and sometimes, what control will help you in a situation).  Overall, the controls should not hinder your performance in any way (coming from the PC version).

Graphics wise, the game has made some improvements since the last iteration.  It adds many more moving parts and higher resolution textures to compliment the setting of the game.  You quickly learn that every square of a test chamber is hooked up to an actuator arm that can modify the room in any given way.  Seeing this in action gives a new sense of awe.  Environmentally, Valve does a great job of showing that the center has not aged well over the years.  With plants growing out of control (including those damn potatoes) and random floor sections missing or failing, it keeps the sense that the building feels alive.

 

Audio (4 out of 5)

Random dialog moments make up the bulk of this score.  Between Wheatley’s random moments of stupidity or one of GlaDOS’s retorts, you find yourself stopping so you get to hear the full dialog (so it doesn’t get cut off by entering another room and triggering another scripted event).  Included in some of tests are some music points (whether its smooth jazz or 8-bit retro sounds) that will ramp up as you progress through the test.  It is not overpowering and is a nice touch.  There is a new final song after you beat the game.  It does not match the awesomeness of Still Alive, but it is still enjoyable.

Overall (5 out of 5)

I’m making a note here: Huge Success.  Portal 2 is an excellent sequel to the original.  It adds enough new elements to challenge veterans of the series, while bringing in some new players.  With co-op, you can now share frustration and anger with a friend (just make sure you do not share violence.  Violence is not part of the test and will not help you along).  Valve has outdone themselves by making a very respectable sequel.  They did not hang around memes created by the first game, and set off to correctly expand the game and its horizons.

P.S.: One note though, co-op store for hats/skins that do not help and only have one other person see at a time….really Valve?  I forgive you for wanting more money….but really?

VN:F [1.9.11_1134]
Rating: 5.0/5 (2 votes cast)

Here’s a little known fact: Polish the Console was essentially founded because of Dragon Age: Origins. We spent so much time having random conversations that stemmed from Dragon Age: Origins that we said “Hey, lets make a website out of it.” Dragon Age quickly became a series that we knew that we were going to follow closely and with much excitement. When they announced Dragon Age 2 we all felt that it seemed quick but we didn’t care. We couldn’t wait. It was more Dragon Age.

Dragon Age 2

That's a man on a serious mission

The more information that we heard about Dragon Age 2 the more we couldn’t wait to play. It’s very existence had us brimming with excitement. We counted down the days until its release like giddy school children count down to spring break. We even considered using up our sick days at the office to camp out in our basements and do nothing but play Dragon Age 2.

Dragon Age 2: Controls

While the controls aren’t revolutionary they are still quite good. Bioware chose to keep their tried and true Dragon Age scheme but give it an added punch. When playing Dragon Age: Origins the presence of an actual player wasn’t always needed. You could just set it to attack something and go make a sandwich while the game took care of itself. You took care of using talents and spells but overall it was an experience steeped in the command mentality of “Go kill that. Okay now go kill that.”

They chose to step up the game a bit by making it more action oriented. Instead of letting the game play itself they gave direct control to the user. No longer to you select who to attack, you attack EVERYTHING. Every swing of the sword / knife / staff is dictated by the user. For me this makes for a more solid and interesting method of gameplay. It makes the user feel as if they are really in control and not just making decisions for someone else.

Ass StampAss StampAss StampAss Stamp

Dragon Age 2′s controls get a 4 out of 5

Dragon Age 2: Gameplay

Dragon Age: Origins was absolutely epic. There were long stretches spent attempting to accomplish one goal. Hours were spent in the Deep Roads and a Fade. You moved from area to area amassing a large army to fight an impending threat. You were picked to save the world from being overrun by evil and quite frankly that’s not something you can wrap up in a weekend and still have time to have dinner with the family.

dragon age 2 races

Does anyone else find the Qunari to be really attractive in this Dragon Age?

Dragon Age 2 takes a different approach. You are not fighting a horde of darkspawn on your way to stop the Archdemon. You have fled Ferelden during the blight and are now trying to create a better life for you and for your family. You get caught up in numerous political problem in the grand city of Kirkwall. You begin to amass a sizable fortune as a business man and because of this your status in the city is elevated and people begin to look up to you and your accomplishments. As you venture through your time as Hawke you really get a sense that Bioware has matured in their story telling for Dragon Age 2. It’s not just about questing and killing. You’re helping a city mired in political problems elevate itself and depending on how you play you can assume the role as it’s leader. Your actions bring about large political changes and ultimately seal your fate as a savior or a villain.

But it is because of these problems that you also don’t ever really leave. That’s a big change from Origins where you went quite literally all over the kingdom of Ferelden to get your job done. In Dragon Age 2 you spend you time either in Kirkwall or in the surrounding area. There’s isn’t much in the way of exploration.

When you do finally get the chance to explore and go cave diving you begin to see some of the problems when you release a game a little too quickly. Literally every cave and every house are exactly like every other cave and every other house. Some have doors that cannot open and start you in different areas but that is the only difference between them. They are literally exactly the same. This does a great deal to completely remove any sense of realism in Dragon Age 2.

While there were epic battles there were no epic quests. Bioware seems to be going after the casual gamer by making everything short and sweet and able to be wrapped up in 15 – 20 minutes. While this helps keep the game churning along at a decent clip it does very little to give you sense that what you are doing is really important. Important things take time. The take great effort. They take more time to complete than I take in the shower in the morning.

Ass StampAss StampAss Stamp

Dragon Age 2′s gameplay gets a 3 out of 5

Dragon Age 2: Graphics

Dragon Age: Origins was not known for being the prettiest game at the party. In fact it was quite the opposite. It was known for being ugly, graphically underpowered (on consoles) and more or less visually unappealing. While it’s still not going to win any awards for being stunning they did definitely improve on what they had. This is most evident with the cameos of past party members. Textures are a little more realistic than they previously were and this is something to applaud, especially given the short time frame between releases.

dragon age 2 flemeth

My dog gives me this same look when he steals my shoe

That being said it has not elevated itself to a level where playing it will make you say “Wow that’s beautiful”. It will make you say “Okay that looks better” but it just doesn’t open up the way it could. When you look at games like Mass Effect 2 that are visually amazing and compare them to Dragon Age 2 you notice that things just don’t look quite right.

Ass StampAss StampAss Stamp

Dragon Age 2′s graphics get a 3 out of 5

Dragon Age 2: Story

As we said before this isn’t a tale of fighting. This is a tale of growth both personal and political. It’s a tail of rising from your station to help a city regain it’s storied magnificence. It is a tale of a man (or woman) who finds their family name sullied and tarnished by a “black sheep” that you must work to rectify.

dragon age 2 hawke male mage

Just look at how awesomely brooding Hawke is

It’s a story that is more grown up and seems to reflect a mentality of “not every problem needs to solved with bloodshed”. That’s not to say that you won’t be throwing down and picking fights you do in fact do this. But you’re drawn into the middle of an unwanted Qunari presence as well as a violently growing schism between mages and templars.  You don’t get to sit on the sidelines or straddle the fence this time around. You witness injustices on both sides but still have to make a choice as to where you stand.

But Bioware is never just about the main story. The side quests in Dragon Age 2 are very interesting as well. When you start to engage your companions and learn more about them you find very interesting stories of kidnapping, hatred, fear, and avarice. You watch their stories unfold and in some instances you come to see that they are responsible for a great piece of the mess you find yourself in. When you’re not interacting with your companions you’re helping others to solve their problems but on more than one occasion this is not a one time quick fix. Their problems stay with you throughout your 7 year journey. The people you help or hurt in year 1 will pay you a visit later on your journey and they are going to have a fairly strong feelings about you. This idea that decisions have larger outcomes is something that I personally always enjoy seeing played out in a game. It makes the decision that much more nerve wracking to the point that I actually sat there thinking “what the hell should I say” for five minutes on more than one occasion.

Ass StampAss StampAss StampAss Stamp

Dragon Age 2′s story gets a 4 out of 5

Dragon Age 2: Overall

Overall Dragon Age 2 is a solid game that is a step up in very many ways from its predecessor. The main story is more interesting and even the side quests are engaging and interesting. However there are a great many flaws that take place that cannot be overlooked. The entire game feels rushed and hurried and just not finished. Because of this the entire game suffers and what could very easily have been one of the greatest games of the year falls short. However it is still a very solid game that was wildly fun to play and fantastically interesting to watch unfold. For this reason we have to give Dragon Age 2 a 4 out of 5

Ass StampAss StampAss StampAss Stamp

VN:F [1.9.11_1134]
Rating: 3.3/5 (9 votes cast)

Bulletstorm LogoPerhaps I’m jaded or perhaps I’m negative but with all the hype surrounding Bulletstorm I never bought into it. It was a little too talked up. I thought to myself “It’s all marketing. It is not possible for this game to live up to what everyone is saying about it. No kidding, the people that make the game think it’s great.” Then the demo was released so I thought I would give it a shot and I downloaded it. I played it once, I deleted it, and I moved on. Bulletstorm was absolutely all hype.

Ishi from Bulletstorm

"Don't let my patchwork exterior I'm really quite the singer."

Finally the release day came and I got my copy of Bulletstorm. While I waited in the morning and early afternoon for my copy to arrive I checked what others had to say and it was doing well. Very very well. So well that I started to feel a small twinge of excitement for its arrival. When I started playing I realized that my initial assessment was spot on. Bulletstorm did not meet the hype. It took the hype kicked it with a shining golden boot and then proceeded to dance on it while singing a jaunty tune. It so flat out beat all of the hype about it that the hype is currently in critical condition and Bulletstorm faces a lengthy sentence for “effing awesome FPS”. Odds are that it is not remorseful and will not get time off for good behavior.

Bulletstorm – Controls

The controls for Bulletstorm are about as tight as tight could be. There is nothing that feels out of place, nothing that feels like it needed to be tweaked. Bulletstorm came out of the gate kickin’ for the balls and landed solid blows each and every time. The controls are precise, common sense, and make the game wonderfully fun to play. Whether you are using the leash to bring a person in, kicking them onto a cactus, or adjusting the flight path of your bullet from a sniper rifle, Bulletstorm’s controls leave nothing to be desired.

Ass StampAss StampAss StampAss StampAss Stamp

Bulletstorm’s controls get a 5 out of 5.

Bulletstorm – Gameplay

Bulletstorm Gag Reflex Skillshot

THIS is how you play Bulletstorm

There are two ways to play Bulletstorm, the right way and the wrong way. If you play it the wrong way you will hate it. You will find it tedious and boring on all levels. When you play it the right way then you will see why Bulletstorm is outstanding. The game isn’t built on the premise of run, shoot, run, shoot, run, shoot some more, duck, cover, shoot, repeat. This breaks the formula for first person shooters with use of their Skillshots. The more Skillshots you perform, the more points you rack up. The more points you rack up, the more upgrades you get.

But you can’t keep using the same one over and over. You have to unlock them for higher point values. You have to use them smartly because if you chain them together you get more points. More points, more upgrades, more fun. Bulletstorm is not a video game where you can merely run into a room and clear it and move on. You have to quickly evaluate the situation and move swiftly to find the best way to clear the area. While some of the enemies might be somewhat formulaic in how you take them down, the game itself never is.

Ass StampAss StampAss StampAss StampAss Stamp

Bulletsorm’s Gameplay gets  a 5 out of 5

Bulletstorm – Graphics

In a word, gorgeous. Every level has clearly been designed to provide as much beauty or filth as possible. This is an overrun vacation resort planet you are on, after all. It should damn well better be picturesque. Bulletstorm does this perfectly. From the scenic views, to the cityscapes, to the flowing rivers, to the absolutely gorgeous way that the water sprays up Bulletstorm delivers in every possible way.

But the views aren’t all there is. The characters and weapons are exquisitely thought out and designed as well. When you wrap someone up with a flail you can see them struggle to get free. If you aim for the arms or legs you can see the damage being inflicted on the arms or the legs. When you overload your weapon it glows a very angry hot glow and as you watch it cool down you watch the weapon slowly work itself down from its fury.

Ass StampAss StampAss StampAss StampAss Stamp

Bulletstorm’s graphics get a 5 out of 5

Bulletstorm – Story

The story takes a break from the “space marine’ trend and puts you in the boots of a space pirate who was formerly a space marine. The reasons for this are something you will have to discover for you own. The story for Bulletstorm could very easily have been its downfall. However they didn’t leave the story in its own world breaking from the action to explain to you why you are doing what you are doing. They fully integrated it into the gameplay itself. When you’re in a firefight you can hear the interactions of all the characters. The people you surround yourself with engage one another while you’re working your way through the world in a way that is both downright hysterical and believable.

It’s these interaction that really help keep you motivated, interested, and ultimately laughing your ass off with the colorful expletives and outstandingly crude metaphors.

Ass StampAss StampAss StampAss StampAss Stamp

Bulletstorm’s Story gets a 5 out of 5

Bulletstorm – Overall

The scores don’t lie. Bulletstorm isn’t your run of the mill first person shooter. It so surpasses everything that’s been done before we just have to shoot the wad on it. Bulletstorm gets a 5 out of 5 for not only being absolutely mind blowingly amazing but for also restoring our faith in hype.

Ass StampAss StampAss StampAss StampAss Stamp

VN:F [1.9.11_1134]
Rating: 4.0/5 (4 votes cast)